Author Topic: How to model a spider's web  (Read 4127 times)

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Offline rowan

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How to model a spider's web
« on: July 09, 2009, 04:12:22 PM »
Subject says it all really.  I mean obviously I could just make a string of intricate tiny polygon cylinders... maybe even use the EP curve tool somehow, neither sounds like the most effecient way.  Does anyone know an actual clever way of making a spider's web?

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Offline Pamz0r

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Re: How to model a spider's web
« Reply #1 on: July 09, 2009, 04:32:27 PM »
couldn't you just apply a texture to a plane? use a .png texture file so you can get the transparency.
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Offline Atcote

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Re: How to model a spider's web
« Reply #2 on: July 09, 2009, 04:33:21 PM »
I'm a cheater when it comes to this sort of thing... I take a flat plane, and just project the texture of a spider web straight on there with an alpha channel on the image. Maya will pick up the alpha for things like shadows if that's relevant, but honestly, it's quick, easy, and most people won't notice the difference.

Other suggestion: Make it up from EP curves (use a camera projection for reference - someone in the labs should be able to assist, but basically create a camera, go to 'Environment' in the Camera1Shape Node (or whatever you've called it), click 'Create' on Image Plane, and select your reference picture), and extrude very thin NURBS cylinders along them ([Surfaces/Extrude] in the Surfaces menu set).

I'd go with the flat plane/image texture approach, as a spider web's so thin, nobody will really notice if it's really 'round' - in fact, that noticability may be what makes it lose its illusion of reality.

Hope that helps.
« Last Edit: July 09, 2009, 04:34:55 PM by Atcote »
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Offline rowan

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Re: How to model a spider's web
« Reply #3 on: July 09, 2009, 06:23:18 PM »
Ah I forgot the texture with an alpha channel... Really shouldn't have given it's in one of my tutorials... Thanks guys I think that will work well.

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Offline ELGATO

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Re: How to model a spider's web
« Reply #4 on: July 09, 2009, 07:33:33 PM »
Hmm depends unless you want to animate that web you might not get the right affect with just a texture map, like for example if you want the web to fall apart or parts of it to move in the wind or to be effected in areas in which a spider is moving on it I would say sometimes the hard and long way in this case might be a better option at the end you will have less limitations and probably learn a few things in the process.

Might wana check this link out too:

http://www.fxguide.com/article388.html
« Last Edit: July 09, 2009, 07:39:08 PM by ELGATO »
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Offline Atcote

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Re: How to model a spider's web
« Reply #5 on: July 09, 2009, 07:39:51 PM »
Not to confuse the matter - I'm assuming Rowan wants to use it for a still image, as that is the first assignment and he is starting off - but to give my twist on the 'making it move' idea, well, for swaying in the wind make it a fluid, to make it fall apart, nCloth all the way - it would probably give it a better sense of movement as well, but it would force it to have to be modeled (unless you want to be really dirty and just nCloth the flat plane, which may be fine for something quick, but not something too noticeable), but the fluid is just an alternative to that.

Sorry if we're making this more complex than it has to be Rowan - if it's for your still image, then use just that - a still image.
Just in case people were wondering, it stands for 'At The Convenience Of The Experimenter.'

And now... this!