Description.
A dense, many-branched, spreading shrub, often reaching (and sometimes exceeding) 1 metre in height and 2 metres in width. Growth form and leaf characteristics vary considerably between populations. Young leaves may appear almost white, while mature leaves are silvery or grey-green. Leaves are woolly to the touch and roughly triangular or arrow-like (hastate). Inconspicuous silvery flowers are followed by large red or pink fruits. In some populations, these fruits give off a noticeable ërotting fishí odour. Each fruit contains a single seed.
Propagation.
Seed germinates readily without prior treatment. Propagation may be possible from cuttings but this has not been assessed.
Flowering.
Flowering is most profuse in spring and summer, but flowers are often present year round. Flowers are inconspicuous
Locations.
Campbells Ln. near Coolamon and the Wagga Wagga Rd north-west of Coolamon.
Wiradjuri Name: Barrinan

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Utility.

The branches and leaves of barrinan were used to start fires. The small berries of barrinan vary when ripe between purple, pink, ruby red and sometimes golden yellow or orange.

Food Uses*.

The small berries of barrinan vary when ripe between purple, pink, ruby red and sometimes golden yellow or orange. The berries are a well known bush food where the small soft flesh and hard seed was eaten (considered texturally similar to pomegranate).

* The critical factor in using plants for food is to avoid accidental poisoning. Eat only those plants you can positively identify and you know are safe to eat. All food details on this website are not based on toxicology reports or scientific knowledge, we make no claim to advice on bush survival in these information bites, only to represent the common perception.

Medicinal Uses.

No current medicinal properties are currently listed.

Based on the flora of the Graham Centre Biodiversity Nursery